Farm

Life

 

Our Story

Technically we have been farming since early 2000s but it wasn’t until we moved to our current property in 2014 that things really took off!

Samantha is the primary farm caretaker with husband Scott masquerading as a 9 to 5'er during the week donning the poop christened farm boots on the weekends. Two of their three children still live on the farm and do many of the day-to-day chores, with their third and eldest helping with big projects both on farm and off! (who do you think is writing this right now? *wink*).

 

It is truly a family affair! If you’re curious and want to learn more about Samantha and Scott, or just want to know their thoughts on farming, click HERE.

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The reason why we farm.
 

animal welfare approved

Animal Welfare Approved (AWA) is an independent, 3rd party, nonprofit certification program by A Greener World that guarantees our animals are raised on pasture, kept sustainably, and humanely raised from birth to processing.

 

This is a charge we take very seriously. We treat every animal on the farm with kindness and respect their entire lives, something we teach our camp kids about.  When it comes time to process, we do so at an abattoir that holds both USDA and AWA certifications. 

 

If you want to learn more, visit the AGW website HERE.

Animal Welfare Approved by AGW LOGO FINA
 

Pasture Raised

Vs

Grass Fed

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What's the difference? The biggest difference is the animal's digestive system. Not all animals can process the forages and grasses in the pasture. Our ruminants (cows and sheep) are grass fed but our monogastric animals (birds and hogs) get supplemental feed but are always out on pasture with fresh water.

What's the difference? The biggest difference is the animal's digestive system. Not all animals can process the forages and grasses in the pasture. Our ruminants (cows and sheep) are grass fed but our monogastric animals (birds and hogs) get supplemental feed but are always out on pasture with fresh water.

What do you feed your pigs? Is it true that they will eat anything?

(Samantha) "When we first started raising hogs I had images from movies of bodies being throw in the hog pen for quick disposal. I was petrified that they might eat my children which is why we chose a small innocent breed that could survive on kitchen scraps (great for a homestead, not so great for selling).

However, as time went on I realized well fed hogs are pretty picky about what they'll eat, just like us. We have everything from Bertha who would eat the kitchen sink if you gave her a chance to Polly who will pick out all the apples and leave the bananas.

All the hogs are fed a vegetarian, locally milled grain with supplemental treats from our kitchen and seconds from our veggie farmer friends. They also forage in the pasture digging up grubs and eating the occasional bug.

It's good to be a Bull City Farm Hog."

Technically chickens and turkeys are scavengers and are so good at it that they barely eat any grain during the summer months. They’re out there chasing down bugs and sifting through poo for a tasty morsel. We’ve also seen them chasing down mice and frogs! They might look cute and fluffy but there’s the mind of a cold-blooded velociraptor in there. If chickens were bigger than us they would gulp us down without a second thought.

Our laying hens are fed a vegetarian feed but supplement A LOT on their own given the chance. Nothing is safe with a flock of chickens around.

Our turkeys are fed a non GMO, locally milled, vegetarian feed. They also supplement with bugs and grubs.

While we feed them a vegetarian diet they feed themselves all the animal protein they can lay their beaks on, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

What about your chickens and turkeys? Are they fed a vegetarian diet?

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Meet the Animals